scoff

scoff, jeer, gibe, fleer, gird, sneer, flout can all mean to show one's scorn or contempt in derision or mockery.
Scoff stresses insolence, irreverence, lack of respect, or incredulity as the motives for one's derision or mockery
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it is an easy thing to scoff at any art or recreation; a little wit mixed with ill nature, confidence, and malice, will do it— Walton

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fools, who came to scoff, remained to prayGoldsmith

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in jesting mood his comrades heard his tale, and scoffed at itLowell

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Jeer carries a stronger implication of loud derisive laughter than scoff; it usually connotes a coarser and more vulgar or, at least, a less keenly critical attitude than scoff
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how does it come that men . . . walk in its streets and jeer and speak their hate— Keesing

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Unsuccessful experiments had been jeered down with an I-told-you-so that rang from coast to coast— Dos Passos)
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inclined to jeer at those slightly older than himself who show any tendency to abandon the —to him—rational preoccupations of childhood— Krutch

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Gibe stresses taunting, often in derisive sarcasm, sometimes in good-natured raillery
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you . . . with taunts did gibe my missive out of audience— Shak.

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after one of her visitations you gibed each other good-naturedly over the extent to which you found yourself shifted from the firm ground of reasoned conclusion— Mary Austin

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generosity of spirit which had prevented him from gibing at individuals for characteristics beyond their control— Gwethalyn Graham

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Fleer throws the emphasis upon derisive grins, grimaces, and laughs rather than on utterances
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look like two old maids of honor got into a circle of fleering girls and boys— Gray

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he listened with a fleering mouth to his father's long dogmatic grace before meat— Hergesheimer

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Gird implies an attack marked by scoffing, gibing, or jeering
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the subprior was bidden to sing ... the "Elegy of the Rose"; the author girding cheerily at the clerkly man's assumed ignorance of such compositions— Pater

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it worked off steam and got its comedy largely by girding at the great ones of the past— Times Lit. Sup.

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Sneer carries the strongest implication of cynicism and ill-natured contempt of any of these terms; it often suggests the use of irony or satire the real purport of which is indicated by an insultingly contemptu-ous facial expression, tone of voice, or manner of phrasing
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it has become . . . fashionable to sneer at economics and emphasize "the human dilemma"— Mailer

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people are nowadays so cynical—they sneer at everything that makes life worth living— L. P. Smith

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Flout may imply any of the actions suggested by the preceding terms, but it carries a heightened implication not only of disdain and contempt but of refusal to heed or of a denial of a thing's truth or power
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that bids him flout the law he makes, that bids him make the law he floutsKipling

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no form of Christianity which flouts science is in the true line of progress— Inge

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for the past eight years they had watched an administration purposely flout the intellectual life— Michener

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Analogous words: *ridicule, deride, mock, taunt: scorn, disdain, scout, contemn, *despise

New Dictionary of Synonyms. 2014.

Synonyms:

Look at other dictionaries:

  • Scoff — Scoff, v. i. [imp. & p. p. {Scoffed} (?; 115); p. pr. & vb. n. {Scoffing}.] [Cf. Dan. skuffe to deceive, delude, Icel. skopa to scoff, OD. schoppen. See {Scoff}, n.] To show insolent ridicule or mockery; to manifest contempt by derisive acts or… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Scoff — Scoff, v. t. To treat or address with derision; to assail scornfully; to mock at. [1913 Webster] To scoff religion is ridiculously proud and immodest. Glanvill. [1913 Webster] …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Scoff — (?; 115), n. [OE. scof; akin to OFries. schof, OHG. scoph, Icel. skaup, and perh. to E. shove.] 1. Derision; ridicule; mockery; derisive or mocking expression of scorn, contempt, or reproach. [1913 Webster] With scoffs, and scorns, and… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Scoff — «Scoff» Canción de Nirvana LP Bleach Publicación 15 de junio de 1989 …   Wikipedia Español

  • scoff — scoff·er; scoff; scoff·ing·ly; …   English syllables

  • scoff — [skɔf US sko:f, ska:f] v [Date: 1300 1400; Origin: Probably from a Scandinavian language] 1.) [I and T] to laugh at a person or idea, and talk about them in a way that shows you think they are stupid = ↑make fun of scoff at ▪ David scoffed at her …   Dictionary of contemporary English

  • scoff — Ⅰ. scoff [1] ► VERB ▪ speak about something in a scornfully derisive way. ► NOUN ▪ an expression of scornful derision. DERIVATIVES scoffer noun. ORIGIN perhaps Scandinavian. Ⅱ …   English terms dictionary

  • scoff — index derogate, disdain (noun), disdain (verb), disparage, flout, humiliate, jape, jeer, mock ( …   Law dictionary

  • scoff at — index contemn, discommend, reject Burton s Legal Thesaurus. William C. Burton. 2006 …   Law dictionary

  • scoff — (v.) late 14c., earlier as a noun, contemptuous ridicule (c.1300), from a Scandinavian source, Cf. O.N. skaup, skop mockery, M.Dan. skof jest, mockery; perhaps from P.Gmc. *skub , *skuf (Cf. O.E. scop poet, O.H.G. scoph fiction, sport, jest,… …   Etymology dictionary

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